Here’s your chance to see a legendary Britten V1000 machine in person


Built in the early ’90s by its visionary creator John Britten, the Britten V1000 is not just a pink and blue work of art that will make any motorcycle enthusiast’s heart beat faster. He is an icon who has broken several world speed records and won numerous competitions. Only ten of these exceptional machines have been made, and one of them is stripped of its bodywork at the Museum of New Zealand.

The motorcycle caused a sensation in the racing world when it first appeared on the racetrack. Visually, the Britten V1000 was eye-catching, but its power and speed made it stand out from the crowd of racers.

John Britten built this legendary bike himself. The whole process started with his Ducati racer as he planned to keep the core and modify his bodywork. However, he ended up designing an all new race-designed bike that he spent nearly 12 years working on.

All that hard work was worth it as the Britten bike turned out to be an incredible machine that would win the Battle of the Twins at Daytona and Assen, New Zealand’s National Superbike Championship, and establish the fastest top speed. Isle of Man TT Rapid in 1993.

The mechanics and aerodynamics of the motorcycle were designed for racing. The Britten V1000 is powered by a John-designed liquid-cooled 999cc V-twin engine from scratch, capable of delivering 166 hp at 11,800 rpm.
John made the bike lighter and more streamlined by using carbon fiber and Kevlar for the frame, wheels and body. He also moved the radiator behind the seat to improve airflow.

All of these complex machines and much more can be admired at the Museum of New Zealand. The bike will be on display until early 2022, and it will not feature its pink and blue bodywork. This is because the staff are doing maintenance work on the Britten V1000, but it only gives guests a once in a lifetime opportunity to see the heart of this incredible beast.

Motorcycle enthusiasts can approach the motorcycle any day of the week between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., except Christmas Day, when the Museum is closed.

About Lillian Coomer

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